Showing posts with label Fashion DIY. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fashion DIY. Show all posts

30 October, 2016

Dreamer DIY

Fashion DIY
Jumper: Oxfam (DIY'd) 

I have been meaning to post this little fashion DIY tutorial for a while but I feel as though it's so simple that it's not really a tutorial, it's more of a DIY idea. After spotting this plain grey jumper in Oxfam for 50p(?!) I thought it provided the perfect opportunity to get onboard the slogan jumper bandwagon that I have been loving all over the highstreet. A few of my favourite slogans out 'n' about include 'Hello Lovely', 'Dream on Dreamer' and um, 'Hangry' because the last slogan pretty much sums me if I haven't breakfast by 10am. In the end I went with a simple 'Dreamer' slogan because as well being another word to sum me up, it was also short enough to fit comfortably on the jumper! So, here it is, the easiest fashion DIY instructions you will ever see! 

Fashion DIY

Ingredients

- Charity Shop Jumper
- Iron on Letters (Other colours include gold, white and blue)
- Iron
- Chalk
- Ruler or Tape Measure

Fashion DIY

1. Mark from the centre front of the neck down to where you would like the top of your slogan to sit. Place the middle letter of your slogan so it sits with the top of the letter touching the mark. If your slogan has an even number of letters, place the middle two letters either side of this mark. 


2. Press the iron onto the letter. The time needed to hold the iron depends on the letters purchased. Instructions came with the letters I purchased (here). I held the iron on for just over 30 seconds on a fairly high heat. 

Once the central letter has been secured, work outwards placing each letter equal distance from the central letter. 

And that's pretty much it. I ended up wearing this jumper most days for a fair ol' while (with a few washes in between)! The price per wear turned out to be per-retty great with the jumper being 50p plus a little extra for the letters. Now I'm off to think about a whole bunch of slogans to upcycle my charity shop t-shirts. Next time you see me I'll be wearing that 'Hangry' t-shirt...! 

Fashion DIY
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04 October, 2016

Fashion DIY X The Thrift

The Thrift
Shirt: DIY'd for The Thrift

Two of my favourite things are blogging and charity shops so I’m always pretty excited when I virtually stumble across a blog about charity shopping. Barnardo’s blog, The Thrift, is a hub full of beautiful charity shop finds and fashion DIY’s. I’m very happy to have been featured as a guest blogger on The Thrift. I wanted to do a little fashion DIY tutorial and whilst out ‘n’ about in my local Barnardo’s I spotted this shirt with great autumnal colours. Since I have lived in the off-the-shoulder shirt I DIY’d using the sheering method earlier this shirt, I thought this shirt provided the perfect opportunity to re-create my favourite top (using a slightly different method) so I have an autumnal version handy. Secured by tying the bottom of the shirt, I have been wearing this with my velvet chocker, black jeans and big ol’ boots for that 90’s grunge look.  The tutorial for you to re-create this off-the-shoulder shirt is now up on The Thrift. Do let me know if you re-create this top on Twitter on Instagram as I would love to see - I'm a little nosy like that...
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08 May, 2016

A little Upcycling

Fashion Upcycling
Fashion Upcycling
Fashion Upcycling
Dress; Old Dress Upcycled, Skirt: Urban Outfitters (Similar), Shoes: Dr Martens 

I have been planning a few clothing up cycles for a while now. Whether that be for the Oxfam Fashion blog, the CLIC Sargent blog, Fix Up Look Sharp, or my little ol' blog. My last posts for both Oxfam and CLIC Sargent were in February and my last fashion DIY for this blog was in December - how has it been 5 months already?!

I have had my sewing machine out a lot but it has been for costume purposes only. A few Sundays ago I had a day free so I set about completing a little fashion DIY. Origionally this top was an old dress which has been sitting at the back of my wardrobe for a longer time than acceptable. I decided to do something about it so I got cutting, pressing and stitching. 

To complete this fashion DIY the dress needs to be slightly bigger. If the top of the dress is fitted then it may be hard to get into the top once the zip has been shortened. 

Ingredients for this DIY

- An old unloved dress
- Thread
- Elastic 
- Scissors 
- Pins 
- Sewing Machine 

Fashion Upcycling 1

I began unpicking the skirt from the top at the waist. There was a zip in the side seam to I cut the zip to slightly shorter than my new top length and secured the end of the zip with a few stitches. I then stitched a small distance from the bottom of the zip to the new hem. I hemmed the bottom if the top.

Fashion Upcycling 2

I then unpicked the sleeves and hemmed them. 

I measured the length of where I wanted my frill to sit across the chest of the dress. As well as measuring the back and front I also added extra to account for the frill going around the arms. I then multiplied this measurement by 1.5 - this is to account for the gathering on the frill. Using the fabric from the skirt I cut a strip of fabric for the frill making sure I was happy with the depth of the frill. 

Since I used the bottom of my skirt for my strip of fabric, one width was already hemmed. If it hadn't been, now would have been the time to hem one width of the strip of fabric. 

I then did a long machine stitch (with no back stitch at the beginning and end) along the top of the strip (with the raw edge) and pulled the loose ends to gather my strip to the measurement I found after measuring where I wanted the frill to sit (with the excess for the arms). 

Fashion Upcycling 3

I then pinned the strip with the right sides of the fabric together. I pinned along the raw edge of the frill (with the wrong side of the fabric facing up). I left enough either side of the top for the arms. I then stitched along where pinned, folding the frill over the stitch line so the right side of the frill was now shown and the stitch line was  hidden underneath the frill. 

I tried the top on at this point.  If you are happy with the way the fabric of the frill around the arms falls then you can leave it at this point. I wanted the frill to be fitted around my arms so I zig-zagged stitched a piece of elastic which was a few centimetres shorter than the width around my arms, from the front of the top to the back of the top. The zig-zag stitch was okay to use on my top as my fabric was patterned so the stitches aren't too visible through the top. However, if your fabric is plain you could use a herringbone stitch on the inside of the top, just catching a tiny bit through the top so it's not visible on the right side. 

And that's it. It was the time to take the top out for a spin! 

Fashion Upcycling
Fashion Upcycling
Fashion Upcycling
Fashion Upcycling
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18 February, 2016

An Oxfam Spring Upcycle

Oxfam Fashion
Oxfam Fashion

Every year when February draws to a close and spring approaches I begin to wonder what on earth I wore last year. Whilst others embrace dressing for the spring months florally and beautifully, I seem to end up looking into my wardrobe with a baffled look upon my face. With a wardrobe full of winter friendly items in terms of both warmth and colour, I thought I would get a head start this year. Having always been obsessed with fashion magazines I usually end up lusting over a hell of a lot of clothes which are well out of my price range. Over the past few years the designer who I have been absolutely loving is Simone Rocha. Ever since her Autumn 2014 collection full of tartan and black lace greatness, I became obsessed. It was grungy, dark with an Elizabethan twist and I wanted it all. Simone Rocha went on to do a collection for J Brand and I loved it just as much. I am often on eBay, trying to get a slice of the Simone Rocha X J Brand pie but so far there has been no such luck. To fill the Rocha shaped hole in my wardrobe I set about doing a little DIY with a pink shirt I found in my local Oxfam. The tutorial for turning a plain shirt into something a little more fancy is up on the Oxfam Fashion Blog. If you are unable to find a suitable shirt I have found a few over on the Oxfam website including a light pink long sleeved shirt and a loose fitting blue and white shirt.

Do you have any suitable-for-spring upcycling tips? If so, I would love to hear them! Also, be sure to let me know if you end up upcycling your shirt Simone Rocha style either in the comments or posting a picture of Twitter or Instagram!

Oxfam Fashion
Oxfam Fashion
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20 December, 2015

30 Minute Fashion DIY | Tie Front Jumper

Tie Front DIY

I have mentioned in previous posts that I am always that girl on a budget so I love looking for ways to re-invent my existing wardrobe. After a little mooch around the high-street the other day I realised I was drawn towards all the tie front tops and dresses in the shops at the moment. Rather than buy another top I headed home and dug out an unappreciated grey jumper from my wardrobe. No sewing machine is required for this tutorial but you will need an Eyelet Punch which you can pick up for around ten pounds over on Amazon. Although ten pounds does seem fairly pricey, an Eyelet Punch is a useful tool because, as well as adapting all your dresses/tops so they have the tie front feature, you can also punch holes in belts - which is perfect if you're anything like me and pick up belts in charity shops then get home and realise they are too big!

Ingredients

- Un-used jumper
- Eyelet Punch
- Eyelets (These come with the punch when purchased using the Amazon link I have used)
- Awl
- Thread
- Needle
- Pins
- Fabric Scissors

Tie Front DIY

Step 1: Cut a split down the centre front of your jumper. The length of this split depends on how far you would like the tie to go down the jumper. 

Tie Front DIY

Step 2: Fold under the raw edges and tack neatening the edge of the split. You should end up with a triangle shape as shown in the picture above.

Tie Front DIY

Step 3: Turn the jumper inside out and pin where you would like the eyelets to go.

Tie Front DIY

Step 4: Push the awl through the fabric where you would like the eyelets to go. This makes inserting the eyelets easier. You may have to wriggle it through a fair amount as you may have to go through two layers of fabric (since you turned the raw edges under in a previous step).

Tie Front DIY

Step 5: Select the colour of eyelets you would like for your jumper. I have chosen silver as I think they go well with the grey jumper.

Tie Front DIY

Step 6: Place your chosen eyelet on the hole punch. Then position over the hole made with the awl in the previous step and press down. Make sure the eyelet is placed on the right side of your jumper and the part of the hole punch without the eyelet is placed on the wrong side of your jumper (this is why it is easiest to do this step with the jumper inside out).

Repeat this until you have the number of eyelets required for one side.

Tie Front DIY

Step 7: Once you have completed one side of the eyelets, pin the other side at the same points so the eyelets are evenly spaced as before.

Use the awl, eyelets and hole punch as before until all your eyelets are in place.

Tie Front DIY

Step 8: When the raw edges were turned under in Step 2 the whole length of the split may not have been turned under in equal measure as a triangle shape was created.If the eyelet has one gone through one layer of the fabric the turned under edge may not be secure. If this is the case just secure with a few tiny stitches which would be too noticeable on the front of the jumper - this is to stop the raw edges unfolding.

Where the eyelets have gone through both layers of the fabric, the eyelet will how the raw edges in place.


Tie Front DIY

Step 9: For the tie to thread through the eyelets I cut a small trim off the bottom of the jumper and left the edges raw (as I didn't mind the jumper being that tiny bit shorter). If you don't want to cut your top you could use lace, ribbon or whatever takes your fancy!

Tie Front DIY

And that's it. 30 minutes later and it feels like a whole new jumper from a previously unloved and unworn top.

Tie Front DIY
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27 August, 2015

5 Ways to get Fashion DIY Inspiration

Fashion DIY

When I look into my wardrobe and lack outfit inspiration it's usually time to get fashion DIY-ing. Since I'm usually on a budget I see what I can do with the clothes I have rather than heading out to the shops and filling my basket - as much as I would always love to do that! When I'm lacking fashion DIY ideas I always look to the same sort of places. From a trip down the high-street to a virtual visit to a favourite blog, inspiration is never far away. Here are a few of my favourite places to gather fashion DIY inspiration*.

*Wonder if that's a world record for the amount of times the word 'inspiration' has been used in one paragraph?

1. Raid the Vintage/Reclaimed section of Urban Outfitters

Fashion DIY

One of my favourite high-street shops is Urban Outfitters. When I'm able to splurge (which isn't as often as I would like if I'm honest!) then I like to head to this high-street haunt. However, one of my favourite sections of the shop is the vintage corner. With DIY'd Levis to cut-off t-shirts, there is all sorts of inspiration to be found on these rails. I often emerge from the vintage corner with mental notes to cut all my t-shirt's, add a lace trim to all shirts and dye all things denim. I'd better get DIY-ing!

2. Re-watch Friends episodes from the 90's

Fashion DIY
Fashion DIY

I LOVE 90's fashion. It's fun, quirky and anything goes. After falling in love (again) with Rachel Green's wardrobe of checked dresses circa. 1995 I stitched together a few of my own last year. With a simple pattern, a sewing machine and some checked fabric, it can take as little as a few hours to re-create dresses/tops good enough to sit at the forefront of Rachel's wardrobe. 90's enough for her to wear on her date in The One Where Ross and Rachel...You Know. Other 90's fashion icons include Drew Barrymore and Cher (Clueless).

3. Browse brilliant web-logs on the inter-web

Fashion DIY

This little space known as the internet is packed to the brim full of inspiration. A Pair and a Spare is my favourite virtual destination when lacking Fashion DIY inspiration. Geneva has so many tutorials - and I want to attempt them all. I clicked across this blog a few years ago and immediately made an easy-to-make tartan skirt. Since then I have been a regular visitor. A few of my current favourites which are on my 'must sew' list are this DIY Off The Shoulder Top and this DIY Lace Up Dress.

4. Get Pinning on Pinterest

Fashion DIY

My Fashion DIY Pinterest page is full of DIY ideas waiting to be completed. From simple DIY ideas (like this tank top decorated with a lace skull) to projects which would require a pattern and a little sewing (e.g. culottes), I can never wait to get DIY-ing after virtually visiting Pinterest. The only problem I'm having right now with this is that I can pin a lot faster than I can sew!

5.  Just start cutting

Fashion DIY
Fashion DIY

Sometimes when lacking inspiration it's just good to get going. Get cutting, start adding trims and all that jazz. It's even easier with denim as I feel that the whole fraying look is okay so minimal effort is required. I've recently cut a shirt and dress, both of which I left fraying - fashion DIY-ing at it's most simple!

Where do you turn to when you're looking for some fashion DIY ideas? 
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